German Journalist Sentenced after Posting WWII Picture of Nazi, Islamic Leader Shaking Hands


german photo islam nazi

After WWII, Germany has adopted strict rules against freedom of speech. One is not allowed to disseminate materials of organizations related to “anti-constitutional organizations.” This week, a journalist in Germany was given jail time for comparing Islam, which he claims is a “fascist ideology,” to Nazism.

A journalist in Germany has been given a 6 month suspended jail sentence for posting a historical photo on Facebook and making the argument that Islam is a fascist ideology.

Michael Stürzenberger, who previously campaigned against the construction of a mega-mosque in Munich, posted a photo on Facebook of a Nazi shaking hands with Amin al-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, during World War Two.

This was accompanied by a passage of text in which Stürzenberger asserted that “Islam is a fascist ideology” and that “political correctness has long prevented this fact from being openly stated.”

Stürzenberger went on to compare the Koran to Hitler’s Mein Kampf.

For this thought crime, the journalist was slapped with a 6 month suspended jail sentence and 100 hours of community service.

Stürzenberger was convicted of “disseminating the propaganda of anti-constitutional organizations,” while the prosecution accused him of “inciting hatred towards Islam” and “denigrating Islam” by publishing a historical photo of the swastika that was used to illustrate the fact that Nazis collaborated with Muslim governments during WW2.

Germany certainly doesn't to repeat the rise of Nazis, which is understandable, but they also risk repeating history by outlawing references to their troubled past. Radical Islam is the new threat to western civilization, but Germany refuses to allow people to criticize its rise.

They want to protect themselves — but they may be empowering an even more dangerous ideology in the process.

Source: Info Wars



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